Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Low Impact, Low Intensity Paintball


The launch of the newly released JT SplatMaster (you can read about it here if you’re not aware of it yet, http://www.pbnation.com/showthread.php?t=3840774 ) has got my mind churning.

From a business perspective, KEE/JT has aimed selling these to kids playing in their backyard and that is what their promotional videos clearly demonstrate.  I’m sure kids will have a lot of fun doing just that (I’m not so sure mom and dad will have as much fun cleaning the paint stains off their siding and their SUV in the driveway though).  The market KEE/JT is aiming at is huge.  I’m sure they will sell quite a few of these.  The novelty, like any toy, I’m sure will wear off, but like the Hoola Hoop, hundreds of millions will be sold to kids all over the world before the novelty wears off.

The whole thing has got me thinking though about how I could use something similar in my business to provide fun to smaller groups of younger and timid players, players that just aren’t quite brave or tough enough to play our current format of paintball.  That market is also very big.  I know from being a field owner that I could get lots of younger players’ (9 to 12 year olds) birthday parties at our field, if the impact of the paintballs and the intensity on the field were considerably milder than what it is now.

But the JT Splatmaster doesn’t quite cut it for me, from a rental point of view.  The upside of the marker is that it needs no air or power source other than that of the user compressing the spring with a pump handle.  That’s awesome.  No CO2 or air needed.  It’s also inexpensive.  The downside is, it’s made of plastic.  Also, shooting 50 caliber paintballs at 100 to 140 fps, although creating impact that hurts very little, seems to be just a little too slow.  I’d have to do some testing, but I think I would like a marker that shoots a 50 cal paintball more in the 175 to 200 fps range (adjustable velocity of course).  I’d also like it made of aluminum.  Without an air source needed, a simple aluminum marker would still be plenty light enough for the 9 to 12 year old crowd.

I realize that to shoot even a 50 caliber paintball at 175 to 200 fps would require a much heavier spring that that in the JT SplatMaster.  That now becomes an issue with strength needed to cock the marker.  I’m not an engineer (nor have I ever played one on TV), but I’m thinking that something with a lever action cocking mechanism could overcome the strength that would be needed issue.

So, are there any engineer/designer/machinists out there up for a challenge?  Assuming you do it right, I’ll take 40 right off the bat and I have a feeling there would be many other field owners out there that would want something like this.  What I’m envisioning is something light, 50 caliber, easy enough for the average 9 year old to cock, removable barrel, spring powered, adjustable velocity (I assume this could be easily accomplished with an adjustment knob at the back to compress/decompress the spring), and a detent (probably a simple wire or rubber one that’s easy on paintballs).  Also, since I am envisioning low intensity games for younger players, the feeder would not have to be large at all.  A “stock class” tube running parallel with the barrel would easily hold plenty of 50 caliber paintballs.  Kids could be given one or two tubes with another 15 or 20 paintballs in them.

So who is in?  I have a feeling there would be a big market for something like this for the “outlaw” crowd as well.  Cheap 50 cal paintballs and no air needed.  Sounds like that would make for a fun weekend up at the cabin.

5 comments:

  1. I think you're going to need a little more data, Reiner, before anybody jumps on board. Whatever you think of KEE's product they had the time and resources to produce a gun & paint that fulfilled their requirements. You think a lever should do the trick. Ok, maybe. Do you know what aluminum costs? Do you have any idea if the paintballs KEE is making for the SplatMaster will work at higher velocities or that alternatives will work at velocities as low as you want to use? And doesn't the fact you're prepared to commit to an intermediate spin-off product just knowing about the SplatMaster prove my point? :)

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  2. Well, I didn't say it was going to be easy. If it were easy, I'd have broke out my dremel tool and hacksaw and I'd be in the shop right now. ;)

    Yes, I realize aluminum is considerably more expensive than plastic. This is not to compete against the SplatMaster, at least not directly. But then, the expected lifespan of the aluminum vs. plastic marker would probably be multiplied a hundred times, so from a rental perspective, it would still be much more cost effective.

    Will the paintballs work? The thought has crossed my mind. They will break
    easier on targets hitting at a higher velocity, so in that respect they will work just fine. Will they be prone to break in the marker? Unknown. But I'm thinking if the Splatmaster can put spins on them in the barrel at 140 fps, I think shooting the same ball without the forces placed on it by such a barrel at 175 - 200 fps would probably work. I can't imagine the 50 cal Ultra Evil paintball being more fragile than its 68 cal counterpart, unless the manufacturing process is completely different. So unless there is something weird going on, shooting them through a straight barrel at 175-200 fps shouldn't be a problem.

    And yes, you are correct that paintball's evolution is a direct result of industries desire/need for profit (I think that's more or less what you said on your site). I myself have said many times that change, unless mandated, is almost always due to economic pressures.

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  3. Actually Reiner, you can get a faster paintball without increasing the force needed to cock the gun. And you can get a faster paintball without increasing the force on the paintball.

    You just need a longer spring.

    That's not to say the length of spring you'd need would be practical though.

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  4. I think this type can be used for paintball games for childreen of the age 9 to 14, as it does not harm them.

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  5. I didn't even know low impact low intensity was an option for paintball, but now that I think about it, I think this would be a much better game for me. Thanks for this idea.

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